16 Apr, 2006 | by

I, like many students of business, have great admiration for Walmart’s tremendous success through its innovative supply chain management structure, relentless pursuit of always having the lowest prices, etc, etc.

This does not mean I admire their complete and total disregard of their own blue collar employees. i.e. Paltry medical benefits and just a shear disinterest in workers in general. I’ll just leave it at that.

Recently, Walmart has begun to cannibalize sales of their own existing stores in various locations. Essentially stores are opening up in close proximately to older stores. Now, you would think Walmart would recognize and avoid such a maneuver given past experience of other retail giants. i.e. Home Depot, Target, etc. continue reading »

8 Nov, 2005 | by
Topics: Global, Strategy

The Harvard Business Review classic article called “The End of Corporate Imperialism”, written by C.K. Prahalad and Kaenneth Lieberthal was passed along to me sometime ago and figured I’d comment on this nice piece of work.  Below is a summary and personal assessment… 

Article Summary:
This pointed article discusses the realization that growth inspired multinational corporations will have to compete in the emerging markets of China , India , Indonesia and Brazil . As these developing countries grow rapidly the necessity to penetrate these markets are apparent as MNC’s clamor for new market share. The article presents the concept of an imperialist mind-set which in their meaning depicts MNC’s of the 80s looking to explode onto the emerging market scene with old products.  Not to mention and old mindset such as “we can still squeeze some profits out of these sunset technologies”. continue reading »

7 Oct, 2005 | by

The following is a summary and assessment of an article I read from the New Zealand School of Management by Des Dearlove called “MANAGING Purpose, Process & People: The new management philosophy”. 

This was a very interesting article that discussed a new management philosophy that claims will one day become dominant. It is called the purpose, process, people philosophy. It is expected to replace our current dominant philosophy, which has driven business for the past 50 years and is based on the idea that a company is purely an economic entity. The current trend indicates that there is almost a paradigm shift from financial capital to human capital, which in itself carries major repercussions under the current model. This new philosophy or trend will move beyond strategy, structure, and systems to purpose, process and peoples. It is a very different mentality that really brings value to an individuals net worth, which in turn puts the onus on employers to realize this value. continue reading »

17 Sep, 2005 | by

I recently read an article, “Corporate Governance: A Development Challenge”, which was authored by two “organization for economic co-operation and development” (OECD) employees.  It peaked my interest as it articulated a compelling argument for global corporate governance that I had not heard before. 

The article touches on the broad spectrum of corporate governance and how it applies to the developing world specifically. I’ve been exposed to local corporate governance issues up to this point in my career and thought this article may expose me to a different perspective.

Article Summary:
The article opens by posing a key question: “Is corporate governance as important in the developing world?” This question was a consistent theme throughout the article as it methodically elaborated via subtopic headings which included “why corporate governance matters for development”, “oligopolistic rivalry and corporate-control rents”, “Pyramids, cross-shareholding, multiple share classes.” And closes with a “what to do?” section. I will comment on each of these sections below followed by some analytical commentary. continue reading »

10 May, 2005 | by

A new approach to strategic management was introduced in the early 1990′s by Drs. Robert Kaplan ( Harvard Business School ) and David Norton. The system was dubbed the ‘balanced scorecard’. The inception of the balanced scorecard was caused due to the weaknesses or ambiguities left from previous management approaches. These known weaknesses of managing solely by financial measures was a commonly understood vice for years. The balanced scorecard approach is intended to provide a clear formula as to what companies should measure in order to balance the financial perspective.

The balanced scorecard is more then just a measurement system. It is a total management system that provides a framework to organizations that helps maintain and clarify a sense of vision or strategy. Along with the vision and strategy that is essential to a company’s growth, the balanced scorecard provides usable data that can be leveraged to take appropriate business action with surgical precision. It provides vital feedback around both the internal business processes and external outcomes in order to continuously improve strategic performance and results. continue reading »