2 Jan, 2009 | by

 

I don’t know that I’ve ever met a business person who said, “I don’t care about data. Let me manage solely by intuition.” This isn’t to say that hunches and gut feel are not important (just see Malcolm Gladwell’s “Blink” if you doubt that), but that most of us understand that our hunches need to face the hard reality of data.

So it shouldn’t be controversial to say that business leaders strive to be data driven.

In the face of this, it is remarkable that so many business leaders do not have ready access to usable, actionable, real-time data. As one colleague put it to me recently: “Most people have tons of data everywhere you turn, but most of that data isn’t accessible or usable.” (Click here for supporting research by The Aberdeen Group). continue reading »

12 May, 2008 | by

 

Yesterday I read a very well written Fortune magazine article titled “what’s wrong with Wall Street and how to Fix It”. I’m sure by now you’ve read countless press releases on the sub prime debacle which don’t always provide a concise view of the situation we now found ourselves in. Rarely do you find articulation of such a complex topic, in written format, that provides just the right blend of depth to go with simplicity, to ensure it resonates with a broad audience. I believe this article fits that mold and wanted to summarize some of its key points and chime in with some personal commentary of my own.

The author, Shawn Tully, encapsulates Wall Street’s issues into three distinct categories. The first is their unyielding appetite for risky trading as opposed to more traditional and reliable fee based business that commercial banks tend to gravitate towards. The second is the dangerous levels of leverage these firms work with. continue reading »

11 Jul, 2006 | by


(Image Created By:  Kurt Griffith)

The topic is obscure to many, but now beginning to gain more and more traction in the political arena, not to mention public opinion forums. What is network neutrality? and should anyone really care? Rather than try and summarize what it’s all about from my perspective, I think I’ll borrow a nice piece that I recently read in the New York Times and kick off m commentary with that.

The author is Adam Green and he throws in his 2 cents as to why Network Neutrality is so important:

As the New York Times editorialized on July 9, 2006:
“Net neutrality” is a concept that is still unfamiliar to most Americans, but it keeps the Internet democratic. … One of the Internet’s great strengths is that a single blogger or a small political group can inexpensively create a Web page that is just as accessible to the world as Microsoft’s home page. continue reading »

17 Sep, 2005 | by

I recently read an article, “Corporate Governance: A Development Challenge”, which was authored by two “organization for economic co-operation and development” (OECD) employees.  It peaked my interest as it articulated a compelling argument for global corporate governance that I had not heard before. 

The article touches on the broad spectrum of corporate governance and how it applies to the developing world specifically. I’ve been exposed to local corporate governance issues up to this point in my career and thought this article may expose me to a different perspective.

Article Summary:
The article opens by posing a key question: “Is corporate governance as important in the developing world?” This question was a consistent theme throughout the article as it methodically elaborated via subtopic headings which included “why corporate governance matters for development”, “oligopolistic rivalry and corporate-control rents”, “Pyramids, cross-shareholding, multiple share classes.” And closes with a “what to do?” section. I will comment on each of these sections below followed by some analytical commentary. continue reading »