26 Feb, 2009 | by
Topics: Marketing, Sales

clients1

 1.     The easiest way to get what you want (i.e. a client’s money) is to give them what they want – or need. Whose money is it anyway?? It’s all about them, their company, their problems, their fears, their needs, their threats and their wants. Research your audience, personalise your pitch by using relevant case studies and only use admissible and appropriate language and jargon. Only talk about yourself and your company, when relating how your qualifications, experience and abilities can help them get what or where they want.

2.     Find out what they want – where they are and where they want to be. Listen aggressively and ask questions. Pay attention to what they say – ask questions to gain more detail or to check that you have really received what they have broadcast, summarise back to them your understanding of their situation, take notes, use their names. Prescription without diagnosis is pants!

3.     Treat people like people – People buy from people they like and trust, especially with the declining trust in that corporate logo on your business card!!! Don’t rush in and knock people over – assess and respect the speed and mood of your audience. Be in the room, employ attentive eye contact, and switch off your Blackberry! Focus on being a human who can help. Long-term loyalty is built up by real long term commitment – relationships count, especially in a credit crunch. (Pitch productivity success rates are great for managers, rubbish for pitch teams – focus on gaining or retaining happy trusting clients one at a time – the numbers and the ratios will look after themselves.) The risk/reward ratios of the client are what you should be focusing on – your impact on them, their career and their organisation is much more than just the project investment or your fee structure. It is where you as a professional could take them, their organisation or their career. ROI and a trusting relationship are a very strong pair. continue reading »

8 Jan, 2009 | by

 

With the global recession, the debate is over, we are truly one global economy.

So where’s the global game board?

Wouldn’t marketing and strategic planning be easier with a global industry game board – a listing of all significant industries, with an industry analysis for each?  And shouldn’t companies be analyzed at the line of business level using the same industry taxonomy?

Everyone answers “yes” to these questions because the answers are so clear.

But then everything gets cloudy with the one additional question, “Do you think such a global industry game board exists?”

For those of you who believe that a global industry information resource does exist, I would like to hear from you via a feedback comment – but first: the reason for the cloudiness is because of the definition of the word “industry.” continue reading »

30 Nov, 2008 | by

Short-term discounts can help preserve cash flow in an emergency, or be used as a strategy to increase market share. But the impact of discounting on your brand, margins and future pricing must be included in your decision!

Commodities are assumed to be equivalent and are sold on price only. Most companies are able to add value and differentiate themselves from their competitors. 

If price is your only advantage – don’t let your competition know. If they have deeper pockets, they will undercut you – and outlive you. Brands like Maybach, Bentley and Mont Blanc do not discount. (Do they?). They know their value and educate their clients about their value.

Identify, analyse and focus on the value that you (can) deliver and how your products or service add value to your clients. And if you are a Top 4 Accountancy Company pitching audit services to a UK based company – do not rabbit on about your global reach!!!! Fool’s Gold!!

Relevant added value, promoted to the right customer, in the right way and with the right customer service will always trump price!

If you do not add and sell value, price will always be your determining factor.