10 Jun, 2009 | by
Topics: Economy, Global

stable_economy

The message from this global financial crisis is loud and clear; the system that we currently have is flawed, susceptible to produce crises and prone to systemic risk.

As a first step, we will have to fully address the SYSTEMIC RISK and the accumulation of excesses in global the economy that tends to build up during the period of strong growth. The hope is that the market participants, the governments and the regulators around the world have learnt their lessons from the ongoing crisis and will take this as an opportunity to reconstruct the financial system and the way it operates. Although one could argue whether it is safe put your faith in the ability of the market, the governments or the regulators to fix the SYSTEMIC RISK issue. No doubt, they have bungled up in the past and they would probably do it again. But that is not the point. We all make mistakes and learn from it. So we have to give them the benefit of the doubt. I hope we are all done with the blame game. The regulators and politicians were pretty quick to put all the blame on the banks, the investors, the insurance folks, the rating agencies and everybody else but not themselves. How convenient.

Honestly speaking, we are all to blame for this financial crisis including the folks on the main street who happily leveraged themselves not worrying about the shortcomings. In fact some folks on the main street got very comfortable with the idea of living on borrowed money without having the ability or resources to meet their obligations. And the reason for that was simple they figured that was the norm. continue reading »

12 May, 2008 | by

 

Yesterday I read a very well written Fortune magazine article titled “what’s wrong with Wall Street and how to Fix It”. I’m sure by now you’ve read countless press releases on the sub prime debacle which don’t always provide a concise view of the situation we now found ourselves in. Rarely do you find articulation of such a complex topic, in written format, that provides just the right blend of depth to go with simplicity, to ensure it resonates with a broad audience. I believe this article fits that mold and wanted to summarize some of its key points and chime in with some personal commentary of my own.

The author, Shawn Tully, encapsulates Wall Street’s issues into three distinct categories. The first is their unyielding appetite for risky trading as opposed to more traditional and reliable fee based business that commercial banks tend to gravitate towards. The second is the dangerous levels of leverage these firms work with. continue reading »